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303 Monroe St, Warren, OH 44483
(330) 394-4653
303 Monroe St, Warren, OH 44483

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abolitionist & me / abolitionist & me / abolitionist & me

me / abolitionist & me / abolitionist & me / abolitionist & me

Welcome To Our

Abolitionist & me Series

a Trumbull County Historical Society initiative to share the stories of the Underground Railroad.

Welcome to Abolitionist and Me, a Trumbull County Historical Society initiative to share the stories of the Underground Railroad. This project brings audiences inside local buildings on the railroad to educate our community about the role Trumbull played in the abolitionist movement, as well as the homes and people that actively participated in the Underground Railroad.

The first video is a brief history of the Underground Railroad and also introduces the viewer to key terms (such as “Stations” and “Agents”). The other three videos take you inside the homes and on the property where Freedom Seekers sought refuge in our community on their way to Canada. These homes are private residences that have graciously allowed TCHS onto their property to film these amazing homes and share their incredible stories.

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Introduction

The Underground railroad began in the 1800s as a way for formerly enslaved people to travel north, away from the plantation owners of the southern United States, and seek freedom as far north as Canada. Despite the name, the Underground Railroad was not really a railroad nor was it underground. Instead, it was a series of buildings and hiding places that freedom seekers could stop at on their travels north.

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Brownwood

Ephraim Brown moved from New Hampshire to Bloomfield, Ohio in 1815 with his wife, Mary Buckingham Huntington and 4 children. Brown was very important in the early community and served as the postmaster, justice of the peace, state road commissioner, state representative, and state senator. His family even owned a dairy farm nearby. Brown was also very involved in the Trumbull County Anti-Slavery Society. The Brown’s first lived in a log house built in 1815 that later grew to be the Brownwood. This Federal style house was built in 1819 with a house far off in the woods that would later be used to hide freedom seekers from the south. 

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Center Brook

This historic estate, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, dates back to 1845, was once home to the famous abolitionists Charles & Julia Brown, and served as a stop on the Underground Railroad. The property includes 110 acres of beautiful gardens, farmland, and orchards, making it a must-visit for history buffs.

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Obermiyer House

The Obermiyer-Hart house in Brookfield is a historic landmark with a fascinating evolution. Built in the 1820s as Squire Ambrose Hart’s General Store, it is now an apartment complex. Additionally, the building functioned as a safe haven for slaves during the time of the Underground Railroad. Today, it remains significant as a testament to the bravery of those who provided refuge and aid to those seeking freedom.